KAROL SUDOLSKI

© KAROL SUDOLSKI

PLEASE, INTRODUCE YOURSELF. WHAT'S YOUR BACKGROUND?

My name is Karol, my parents are polish and I was born in Poland too. When I was a kid we moved to Italy (in Valtellina) where I grew up on mountains. I moved to Milan to study and it later became my home.

WHAT ASPECTS OF 3D GRAPHICS DID YOU FALL IN LOVE WITH AND WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO MAKE IT YOUR ACTUAL JOB?

It was an accident, I'd never though I could end doing what I do now, especially the 3D thing. I grew up with video games, dreaming CGI cities from sci-fi movies or role playing games evocations. It was only after university, working with Cameranebbia guys for an installation contents, experimenting and trying to understand how to get the work done that we end up using photogrammetry. Later, I got fascinated by this thing and never left it anymore. At the moment, what I love at about the 3D stuff is the possibility to capture a piece of real world, obtain a high quality graphic texture and a likely mesh but featuring imperfections, sometimes unpredictable. It is this kind of equilibrium between realistic and digital that I think to be sexy and I always look for it.

AS A SELF TAUGHT, WHAT ARE PROS AND CONS IN THIS KIND OF APPROACH?

Learning by yourself make you feel free and independent but it takes more time and it's all about the effort you put in it. You can choose what to learn and what not but sometimes what you decide to skip is exactly what you need. You learn by failing but you don't replicate a scheme/recipe and so it's easier to move on other softwares which have different logics and interfaces.

WORKING A LOT WITH MUSIC, WOULD YOU CONSIDER WHAT YOU DO A VISUAL TRANSLATION OF SOUND OR A COMPLEMENTARY ELEMENT?

I would immediately say totally complementary. I don't think images (and this is generally speaking) can be substituted by music and viceversa. They say different things in different ways. As you say, I work a lot with music, I don't have a large music knowledge and I don't understand it. I also have big issues with rhythm and timing - when I was younger my bass guitar teacher suggested I should change my hobby. Associating images makes it easier for me to develop an emotional sprint toward music and interpretation, remembering it and noticing its shades. So is what I am doing a translation? Yes but very subjective and a very personal Rosetta Stone.

WHICH SOUND ELEMENTS INSPIRE YOU THE MOST OR YOU WORK BETTER WITH? HAVE YOU EVER FOUND YOURSELF REJECTING A COMMISSION BECAUSE YOU WHERE NOT FEELING THE MUSIC?

I prefer electronic and abstract sounds with water, weather and spacial references. A general dark feeling. But I also like to work with hard sounds, they're funny. I think music can't be separated from the person that generated it or that gives his/her name to i or from the imaginary that surrounds it. Considering that I suck in music, I have to listen to a track many times to tell if I like it or not. I don't remember any moment where I said no just because I wasn't feeling it. Rather, I often fall in love with music by working on it and beginning with a bit of distrust. Most of my rejections are due to the time that I don't have to work on a projects.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO TALK ABOUT YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS? HOW DO YOU APPROACH AND ANALYSE A PROJECT THAT NEEDS TO BE SIDED BY YOUR IMAGES?

When people ask me about this I always fear to look like a moron. The design spirit did not sediment in my body so I don't have a precise plan nor I am a big planner. I just go random rather than moving with an artistic sprint. A lot of ideas come while I am processing the point cloud. Later I cross them with what I feel or see. In the end it's just a matter of sensations and abstraction. My stuff doesn't mean anything. When I am working on a video, I always do it with Giorgio Calace, a photographer that knows about sounds. Another voice joining the conversation.

© KAROL SUDOLSKI

© KAROL SUDOLSKI

WOULD YOU LIKE TO TALK ABOUT YOUR 3D SCANNINGS? WHAT DO YOU THINK IT MAY ADD (OR TAKE AWAY) FROM YOUR WORK ON A CREATIVE LEVEL? I NOTICED YOU RARELY USE ABSTRACT FORMS. DO YOU EVER DO RESEARCHES ON ON PHYSICAL OBJECTS TO STUDY THEM AND LATER TRANSPOSE THEM IN A VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT OR YOU JUST USE MEMORIES TO START FROM SCRATCH?

The photogrammetry is a type of 3D scanning that is made from a big quantity of photos of a static subject. These images are then processed by softwares that identify common points in the images, located in a 3D space, connect them in volumes and generate a surface. It's a process that I'm still fascinated by since the first time I experimented it. A good result depends on how much the model is able to stay still, on lights, on shadows and on the material that it is made of. Reflecting surfaces, for example, change appearance as you change your point of view, so it is theoretically impossible to make a photogrammetry of them. Anyway, sometimes impossible things generate errors, digital messes and fails that are great creative inputs. In a certain way, my working process is based on total randomness, it's about researching and fomenting the error, and later arranging. It's also about fail compositions and positive results that are in balance. That's one of the reasons why abstract forms are absent in my compositions. I always start from real objects, often characterized by the failure risk in the acquisition phase, things of which I like the form, the colours, the light (natural) or owned by people I know. Sometimes the model looks good from an objective point of view and it resembles the real one. Sometimes it's a nice mess that preserves all the original pieces but returns them distorted and crashed. That's how my 3D patterns gets generated, that's where key elements fit. It's a balance between good and bad scanning results. One more reason why there are no abstract forms or clean geometries is because I don't like them. I have a very dirty aesthetic, fragmented and confused. I'm not interested in precise and correct models and I’m not going to learn how to make them (obviously I am totally unable to do them now).

WHAT HELPS YOU FOCUSING YOUR CREATIVITY?

Nothing. I have big concentration issues. Having anxiety pushes me to sit in front of a pc but my anxiety also paralyses me. I can say the same about company, coffee and blunts. During crisis and out of focus moments I ride my bike and reorganise my place, empty my drawer or decant plants.

Visuals are often seen as a filler, a generic background interrupted by the lights pointed on the artist. I hope they will get a bigger relevance or better consideration

WHY, IN YOUR OPINION, THERE IS ALWAYS MORE REQUEST FOR VISUALS NOWADAYS?

I am happy about that but I can't really explain it. Nowadays it's easier, for sure, to have video scenographies and I think we need and have an obsession for images that make us put them everywhere. Anyway,well done visuals, connected with the music are able to match, exalt and amplify the message, creating a particular audiovisual experience.

HOW DO YOU THINK (OR HOPE) THIS SECTOR WILL EVOLVE, IN THE NEXT YEARS, IN TERMS OF OF CONTENTS, THEMES BUT ALSO CREATIVE APPROACH AND AUDIENCE RESPONSE?

Visuals works, so I hope there will always be a bigger investment for what concerns creating contents but also equipments that are able to produce visuals in clubs. I hope in a new direction toward visual shows: visuals are often seen as a filler, a generic background interrupted by the lights pointed on the artist. I hope they will get a bigger relevance or better consideration.

FUTURE PROJECTS?

Making something mine. It's a commitment more than a project. Being very inattentive and fearing free time, I find it hard to have some time to work just for myself and I usually put my ideas in other people works.

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